Medical Medium Blog

Welcome

Hello and welcome to the Medical Medium Blog. I'm so happy to have you here. Visit this blog anytime for inspiration and valuable insights on fruits, vegetables, herbs, spices, recipes, and practices that will help you to heal and feel your best. Happy reading!

Quinoa Vegetable Salad

It's hard to beat the fresh flavor and dense nutrition of a leafy green salad piled high with your favorite fruits and vegetables and a fantastic dressing. But there's hundreds of other ways to create delicious, beautiful salads.

Today I have one more recipe you can add to your salad repertoire. It's hearty, fun, colorful and versatile. You can chop and change the vegetables, spices and herbs in almost any combination each time or stick to your favorites. You can switch the quinoa for another gluten free grain of choice like millet or brown rice, or leave it out entirely if you're sensitive to grains or healing, and instead use raw cauliflower processed in a food processor until it resembles rice.

This salad is wonderful alone or served on top of baby spinach, romaine, butter leaf lettuce or mache.

Quinoa Vegetable Salad

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups dry quinoa
  • 3 tomatoes, chopped
  • 1 yellow bell pepper, chopped
  • 1 red bell pepper, chopped
  • 1 orange bell pepper, chopped
  • 1 medium cucumber, chopped
  • 1/4 jalapeño, finely chopped (or more as desired)
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 tsp fresh thyme 
  • juice of 1 lemon
  • 1 tsp lemon zest
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • sea salt and pepper to taste

Directions:

  1. Cook the quinoa according to the instructions on the package. Set aside to cool.
  2. Once cool, chop the other ingredients and toss with the cooled quinoa. Taste and adjust seasonings and flavor as desired.
  3. If you prefer a warm salad you can stir the raw vegetables and other ingredients through the quinoa when it is just cooked and eat it right away.

Disclaimer

Healing Celery Juice

Fresh celery juice is one of the most powerful and healing juices one can drink. Just 16 oz of fresh celery juice every morning on an empty stomach can transform your health and digestion in as little as one week.

Celery juice also has significant anti-inflammatory properties making it highly beneficial for those who suffer from autoimmune conditions such as Fibromyalgia, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Migraines, Vertigo, IBS, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Psoriasis, Eczema, Acne, Lupus, Guillain-Barre, Sarcoidosis, Raynaud's, Meniere's, GERD, Bursitis, Restless Leg Syndrome, and Gout.

Celery juice is also strongly alkaline and helps to prevent and counteract acid reflux, acidosis, high blood pressure, joint pain, ringing in ears, tingles & numbness, hot flashes, blurry eyes, headaches, heart palpitations, edema, heartburn, fatigue, dizziness, muscle cramps, sleep issues, constipation, and bloating. It also helps to purify the bloodstream, aid in digestion, relax the nerves, reduce blood pressure, and clear up skin problems. Celery contains compounds called coumarins which are known to enhance the activity of certain white blood cells and support the vascular system. 

Celery juice is rich in organic sodium content and has the ability to dislodge calcium deposits from the joints and hold them in solution until they can be eliminated safely from the kidneys. It is also an effective natural diuretic and has ample ability to flush toxins out of the body which makes it excellent to use on any weight loss program.

Celery Juice

Ingredients

  • 1 bunch celery* (makes approx 16oz juice)
  • *organic when possible

Preparation

Wash 1 bunch of celery and run through a juicer, drink immediately for most therapeutic benefits. However, if you prefer, you can also blend the celery in a Vitamix, Nutribullet, or any high speed blender with a little water and either drink as is, or strain as desired.

optional: if you find the taste of straight celery juice too strong, you can add a cucumber &/or an apple to the juice, however this will slightly dilute its effectiveness. Or, if you prefer a more gentle juice you can make straight cucumber juice instead which is also very healing and beneficial.

Learn more about how to heal and restore your body in my new book Medical Medium: Secrets Behind Chronic & Mystery Illness & How to Finally Heal.

Disclaimer

Thyme Tea

Thyme tea contains potent anti-viral properties and is essential for Epstein Barr, Shingles, Hepatitis, Influenza, Herpes, Cytomegalovirus, HPV, etc. If taken on a regular basis it can significantly help to reduce the viral load in the body which makes it highly beneficial for those suffering with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Fibromyalgia, Hashimoto's Thyroiditis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Lupus, Vertigo, Tinnitus, and Multiple Sclerosis.

Thyme tea also helps stimulate memory, ease headaches and muscle tension, soothe coughs, relieve fevers, and fight colds and infections. It also contains a compound called carvacrol which is an excellent natural tranquilizer and has a tonic effect on the entire nervous system. Thyme is a good source of pyridoxine which is known to play an important role in manufacturing GABA levels in the brain, aid in regulating sleep patterns, and benefit neurotransmitter function in the brain. GABA is also one of the best natural defenses against stress damage.

Thyme tea is a great purifying herb for the digestive tract and has been found to destroy certain intestinal hookworms and roundworms and aid in the digestion of rich or fatty foods. Thyme is also essential for urinary tract health and can help prevent infections and keep healthy bacteria in balance. Thyme has some of the highest antioxidant levels among herbs. It is packed with bioflavonoids such as lutein, zeaxanthin, and naringenin which have powerful effects on eliminating free-radicals and other disease producing substances from the body.

Fresh thyme can be found in the produce section of your local supermarket or health food store. Thyme is also an exceptionally easy herb to grow and can produce abundantly in both containers &/or home gardens.

Thyme tea is a powerful healing drink and can be made by infusing fresh thyme leaves in hot water and allowing to steep for 15-20 minutes. 

Thyme Tea

Ingredients

  • 2 springs of fresh thyme
  • 10-16 oz hot water
  • optional: fresh lemon &/or raw honey

Preparation

Place fresh thyme in a mug and pour hot water over, allow to steep for 15 min or more. Remove thyme springs or strain. Sweeten with raw honey &/or lemon. Sip and enjoy! :) 

Alternatively, a thyme infused water can be made by soaking fresh thyme springs overnight in a pitcher of room temperature water and sipped the next day for hydration & healing benefits. 

Thyme Water

Ingredients

  • 2 whole bunches fresh thyme springs
  • 32-64 oz filtered or spring water
  • optional: fresh lemon, raw honey, berries, cucumber slices, mint etc

Preparation:

Fill jug or pitcher with room temperature water and add thyme springs. Allow to soak on the kitchen counter overnight. In the morning remove/strain thyme sprigs and add lemon or raw honey or any optional ingredients you like. Sip water throughout the day for the ultimate hydration and healing benefits.

To learn more about which herbs and foods can heal and restore your body check out my new book Medical Medium: Secrets Behind Chronic & Mystery Illness and How to Finally Heal.

Disclaimer

The Truth About Menopause

Menopausal or premenstrual symptoms wreaking havoc with your life? It might not be “just hormones.” 

Prior to the 1950s, women looked forward to menopause, as it typically signaled a time of increased energy, heightened libido, and a slowing of the aging process. Starting around 1950, however, the first signs of ‘mystery illness’ began to appear, sending women to their doctors in droves, complaining of symptoms that hardly existed before, including night sweats, hot flashes, fatigue, weight gain, digestive trouble, headaches, irritability, depression, anxiety, forgetfulness, insomnia, and more. Initially doctors dismissed these complaints, telling women that it was “all in their head,” that they were just bored and seeking attention, and they should join the PTA. The push-back from women was fierce, and eventually doctors were forced to acknowledge the situation. Hormones became the scapegoat, with these previously unseen symptoms being attributed to hormonal imbalances and/or deficiencies. 

Because all the blame was placed on hormones, it seemed logical that menopausal women should take prescription hormones to “correct” the imbalances. Thus, hormone replacement therapy (HRT) was born. After research linking HRT to increased risk of breast cancer, heart attacks, and strokes came to light, bioidentical HRT (i.e., hormones chemically identical to those produced in the body) came into the mix. While some women experienced relief via these treatments, it was often temporary, and/or small in scope. Nonetheless, “hormonal imbalance” is still considered the chief culprit of menopausal symptoms. This might make more sense if so-called menopausal symptoms only affected middle-aged women, but these days, women of all ages experience many of the same issues that previously only affected women in their 40s and 50s. The prevalence of the same suffering in younger and younger women paints a bigger picture than just hormone problems. 

There are additional factors that can lead to the symptoms attributed to menopause. Around the same time that women first began experiencing these symptoms, three other phenomena were also at play. First, people in the US were experiencing increased radiation exposure due to fallout from the World War II bombings in Japan. At the same time, there was an explosion of DDT (i.e., pesticide) exposure. In the 1940s, DDT was used everywhere: on crops and food, in parks, and people even sprayed it on their own gardens. By 1950, DDT use was at its height, and the central nervous systems and livers of countless women had become overloaded with the toxin. The third factor was Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). The first generation of women complaining of menopausal symptoms had been born in the early 1900s, just as EBV was beginning to encroach upon the population. EBV typically enters a woman when she is young, then spends decades building itself up to the point where symptoms emerge. So if a woman was born in 1905 and had contracted EBV as a child, by 1950 she would begin to experience symptoms of this viral infection. In other words, the fact that symptoms manifested around the age of menopause was a coincidence. Today, rather than waiting several decades to strike until a woman is in her 40s or 50s, some viral strains and toxic loads are now affecting women in their 30s, 20s, and even in their teens. 

This is not to say that hormones can’t go off balance. When they do, the culprit is often overworked adrenal glands (i.e., adrenal fatigue) and/or underactive thyroid, which can throw reproductive hormones off-kilter at any age. The point, however, is that hormone imbalance may only be one piece of the puzzle. The good news is that all of these things—radiation, viruses, toxic load, and reproductive hormone issues—can be addressed with healing foods that tackle a wide range of pathogens and toxins that could be contributing to your symptoms. Foods and herbs to focus on are those that boost immune function and support the reproductive system, including: 

  • wild blueberries
  • sesame tahini
  • avocados
  • black beans
  • asparagus
  • apples
  • spinach
  • black grapes
  • cucumbers
  • raspberry leaf
  • nettle leaf
  • chastetree berry 
  • elderberry

These foods represent a simple yet powerful way to address your “alleged” menopausal or PMS symptoms. They provide antioxidants and other nutrients that help fortify vital organs and reduce hot flashes. They also quench inflammation and help keep reproductive hormones balanced.

Above all, keep in mind that menopause is a normal part of life, and is not meant to be a difficult process. By nourishing your body with healing foods, and addressing the true underlying causes of your symptoms, you can return to living a healthy life and embracing life at every stage. 

To learn more about the unknown causes of menopause and PMS symptoms and how to address them, check out Medical Medium: Secrets Behind Chronic and Mystery Illness and How to Finally Heal.

Disclaimer

Adrenal Fatigue

Our adrenal glands produce important hormones, including adrenaline and cortisol, which are essential for mounting an effective response to stress. However, these responses are predicated on the notion that the stress response is a short-lived reaction to immediate threats that resolve quickly. When someone experiences ongoing stress, however, such as financial trouble, a demanding job, or chronic illness, the adrenal glands get overextended, and can end up having the equivalent of a nervous breakdown and behave erratically.

The notion that “burned out” adrenals simply stop producing the full amount of hormones needed is inaccurate. What really happens is that exhausted adrenals produce either too little or too much hormone. In both cases, the negative health effects are profound. For example, excess adrenaline can deplete your brain of important neurochemicals, leaving you feeling depressed. Excess cortisol can put extreme burden on your liver, central nervous system and brain. Too little cortisol can wreak its own havoc, and negatively affect thyroid function.

Symptoms of adrenal fatigue may include weakness, lack of energy, trouble concentrating, becoming easily confused, forgetfulness, trouble completing basic tasks, poor digestion, depression, and insomnia. As these symptoms can have multiple causes, additional clues that can point to adrenal fatigue include:

  • “Crashing” early on and/or throughout your day
  • You’re tired all day at work, but feel energetic in the evening
  • You’re exhausted at night but have trouble falling asleep
  • Feeling unrested after a full night’s sleep
  • Sweating excessively when performing light tasks (due to your endocrine system working overtime to compensate for lack of adrenaline)
  • Feeling thirsty and can’t seem to quench your thirst, you have dry mouth, or crave salt
  • Blurry vision or difficulty focusing (cortisol can dehydrate the body, including the eyes)
  • Craving stimulants. If you’re reaching for cigarettes, caffeine, and/or sugary snacks to keep you going, you may be instinctively substituting your diminishing adrenal hormones.

A Natural Approach to Adrenal Fatigue

Eating only three times per day can be tough on the adrenal glands, because your adrenals release cortisol if your blood sugar drops too low between meals, which brings your blood sugar back up. So if you frequently go without eating for long stretches, you’re straining your adrenals and not giving them a chance to recuperate. Thus, you can support your adrenals by eating a light, balanced meal every 90 minutes to two hours. This helps keep your blood sugar steady throughout the day so that your adrenals don’t have to interfere, giving them a chance to rest and restore themselves.
Ideally your meals should contain a balance of potassium, sodium, and natural sugar (i.e. from fruits, which contain critical nutrients, not table sugar!) 

Examples of adrenal-supportive meals include:

  • A date (potassium), two celery sticks (sodium), an apple (sugar)
  • Half an avocado (potassium), spinach (sodium), an orange (sugar)
  • A sweet potato (potassium), parsley (sodium), lemon squeezed on kale (sugar)

These examples needn’t be substitutes for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, but they help keep your blood sugar steady between those bigger meals. 

Other foods that support adrenal health include sprouts, asparagus, wild blueberries, bananas, garlic, broccoli, kale, raspberries, blackberries, romaine lettuce, and red-skinned apples. These foods help strengthen the nervous system, reduce inflammation, ease stress, and provide critical nutrients for adrenal function. 

The Role of Fats and Carbohydrates

In addition to the above recommendations, moderating your fat intake is also helpful. This is because a very high-fat diet burdens your pancreas and liver, which can negatively impact blood sugar levels. To get a full explanation of how this works, read my book Liver Rescue. When your blood sugar is not under control, it creates a massive strain on your adrenals as they struggle to produce hormones to compensate.

While lower-carb diets have some benefits, keep in mind that your body needs good-quality carbohydrates for energy, and a diet that is too low in carbs also strains your adrenals. Just ensure that the carbs you eat come from nutritious foods like fruits and vegetables, not pastries, candy, and soda!

Complete avoidance of stress is unrealistic, but you can take steps to ensure that your body is equipped to cope with whatever life throws at you. By consuming healthy, nutrient-dense foods at regular intervals, you nourish every aspect of your being—and give your adrenal glands a well-deserved break so that they can help you when you really need it.

To learn more about how to address Adrenal Fatigue, check out Medical Medium: Secrets Behind Chronic and Mystery Illness and How to Finally Heal.

Disclaimer

Roasted Cauliflower

Cauliflower is a nutrient rich vegetable that is excellent for supporting a strong immune system and optimum health. Cauliflower is incredibly high in vitamin C, K, and B-complex and minerals such as boron, calcium, molybdenum, and tryptophan. It is also a good source of high quality protein that is easily assimilated into the body. Cauliflower contains powerful anti-cancer compounds such as indole-3-carbinol and sulforaphane which are particularly beneficial for helping to prevent breast, cervical, ovarian, colon, stomach, and prostate cancers. 

Cauliflower also contains a compound called Di-indolyl-methan (DIM) which has been shown to be effective in the treatment of the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) and cervical dysplasia. Cauliflower also has excellent anti-inflammatory properties due to its omega-3 and vitamin K content and is an essential food for those trying to prevent chronic inflammation as in fibromyalgia, hepatitis, arthritis, cardiomyopathy, cystic fibrosis, IBS, and Alzheimer’s disease. 

Roasted cauliflower gives you a fun way to prepare this veggie for family and friends. These thick slices of cauliflower are roasted with spices and herbs giving you a delicious and also beautifully presented meal.

Roasted Cauliflower Wedges

Ingredients:

Directions:

Preheat oven to 400°F. Line 2 baking trays with parchment paper. Slice a whole cauliflower from top to bottom into three very thick slices and place in the baking trays. 

Whisk together the oil and spices and brush or spoon over the cauliflower. Bake in the oven until tender, about 15-20 minutes. Time will vary base don your oven so check it often. Garnish with scallions and herbs and enjoy!

Disclaimer

Shingles Virus

Shingles is an illness that can produce fever, headaches, rashes, joint pain, muscle pain, neck pain, nerve pain, and other highly unpleasant symptoms. Typically, a shingles diagnosis is never made if no rash is present. In reality, however, the shingles virus is responsible for millions of people’s mystery symptoms, from unexplained rashes to neurological symptoms to migraines, and more.

The prevailing view of shingles is that a red rash or pustules always accompany it. However, this is merely the classic presentation of one type of the virus that causes shingles. There are actually 31 varieties of shingles viruses (15 of which are the most common), and they all cause different symptoms. Seven of the shingles strains do cause rashes, just not always in expected areas, while the other eight strains cause no rashes. So if you’re experiencing most of the symptoms of shingles but have no signs of it on your skin, it’s possible you have a non-rash shingles virus.

Shingles with rashes

There are seven strains of shingles that cause rashes. They’re primarily distinguished by the different types and locations of rashes they create. These include: 

  • classic shingles (rashes appearing anywhere from the chest to the feet) 
  • upper body (rashes appearing from the chest up but not on the arms) 
  • both arms 
  • one arm 
  • head (rash on the top and sides of the head) 
  • both legs 
  • vaginal shingles (appears outside but near the vagina, or inside the crotch area)

A misconception about shingles is that the virus resides directly under the rash, wherever it happens to be, but it actually lies much deeper, awaiting an opportunity to inflame your nervous system. In these strains, the virus releases a neurotoxin that travels to your peripheral nerves and skin. It is this neurotoxin that causes the rash and pustules for which shingles is so famous. 

Shingles Without Rashes

There are eight strains of shingles that typically do not cause rashes. These include: 

  • Neuralgic shingles – attacks the lower extremities, with nerve pain in the legs or feet. Often misdiagnosed as diabetic neuropathy. 
  • Maddening itch shingles – involves a moving itch that can’t be scratched because the virus is irritating nerves too far beneath the skin.
  • Vaginal shingles – goes into the inner vaginal walls and inflames the nerves there.
  • Colitis shingles – causes severe inflammation in the inner lining of the colon.
  • Arm and leg burning shingles – creates a hot, burning pain in your arms and legs. 
  • Mouth, TMJ, and Bell’s Palsy shingles – affects the gums and/or jaw area. It’s also responsible for Bell’s palsy (viral inflammation of facial nerves) and TMJ (a result of trigeminal nerve inflammation and pain). 
  • Frozen shoulder shingles - aggravates the nerves in the shoulder, causing it to freeze up for anywhere from a month to a year. Often misdiagnosed as infectious bursitis.
  • Body on fire shingles - makes every part of your body feel like it’s on fire. 

As with the rash-producing strains, the non-rashing strains also produce a neurotoxin. In this case, the neurotoxin travels inward to larger nerves. There is typically more internal pain and nerve injury than with the rash-causing strains. If you are diagnosed with shingles (despite the absence of a rash), your doctor may prescribe immunosuppressant medications to reduce the severity of the attack. Unfortunately, this can make the problem worse in the long run. You don’t want to suppress your immune system; you want to support it so it can fight the virus. 

Rash or no rash, shingles can be excruciating. Fortunately, there are simple yet powerful remedies for beating this insidious virus and its many strains. How long this takes depends on how long the virus has been in your system, whether you’re in a healthy or a toxic environment, and the strength of your immune system. Practice basic self-care and support your immune system by eating well, exercising, and getting sufficient sleep.

Healing Foods

Certain foods can greatly aid the body in healing from shingles with and without rashes. The ideal foods to concentrate on are:

  • wild blueberries
  • coconuts
  • papayas
  • red-skinned apples
  • pears
  • artichokes
  • bananas
  • sweet potatoes
  • spinach
  • asparagus
  • lettuce (leafy and deep green or red varieties)
  • green beans
  • avocados

These foods help because they contain powerful phytochemicals that can attack the different strains of the virus. This supports recovery from neurotoxin flare-ups, boosts the immune system, heals nerves, soothes inflamed skin, and helps detoxify the body. 

The pain of shingles can make you feel like your life is going up in flames, but by generously incorporating these foods into your diet, you can douse the fire, and get back to living the vibrant life you are meant to have. 

To learn more about how to address Shingles, check out Medical Medium: Secrets Behind Chronic and Mystery Illness and How to Finally Heal.

Disclaimer

PTSD

If you're like most people, when you hear the term “post-traumatic stress disorder” you think of war veterans and survivors of a traumatic event. When your life is in imminent danger, your fear triggers a fight-or-flight response that floods your body with adrenaline, so that you can respond to the threat. Once the threat has passed you may experience emotional aftershocks. This is the classic form of PTSD recognized by therapists and psychiatrists. 

However, there’s an epidemic of hidden PTSD in our culture. In its true definition, PTSD involves lingering negative feelings that can result from any adverse experience—getting fired, the end of a relationship, chronic illness, or even just a time when you feel like you failed at something—and that limit a person in any way. These feelings can include fear, doubt, panic, avoidance, anger, hypervigilance, irritability, sadness, shame, vulnerability, distrust, and more. 

There are no limitations to what can cause PTSD, yet even in today’s modern times of self-help, therapy, and emotional understanding, health professionals mostly reserve the term PTSD for life-or-death experiences. This ignores the numerous incidents that alter (for the worse) the way someone experiences life. Regardless of its cause or scope, PTSD negatively influences the choices we make and changes the fabric of who we are.

What is happening

On a physiological level, PTSD causes a chemical imbalance in the brain that occurs when someone experiences trauma. Glucose is a protective biochemical that provides a veil of protection for sensitive brain and neurological tissue. If there isn’t enough glucose stored in the brain to feed the central nervous system and to protect the brain from the corrosive effects of adrenaline and cortisol released during stress, emotional upheaval can create lasting effects. If someone’s glucose storage is low, she or he could get PTSD just from a flat tire, while someone with sufficient glucose storage could witness an armed robbery and tell the story to a friend over dinner that same day, unruffled.

Our culture also has a history of burying emotions with food (especially sugar), alcohol, drugs, and adrenaline-fueled activities. The problem with these approaches is that what goes up must come down. A sugar high from cupcakes means a crash later. And while an adrenaline high from running over fiery coals may feel healing and empowering in the moment, the surge won’t last. 

Solutions for dealing with PTSD

One of the most powerful ways to heal PTSD is to create new experiences to serve as positive reference points in your life. These experiences don’t have to be big, or risky (nor should they be). It’s all about how you perceive each new adventure, however tame. 

Keep a list of every new experience, taking notes on how you felt. For example, when you took a walk, did you see any birds? What was the weather like? What effect did it have on your state of mind? It’s all part of being in the moment. When you create new, constructive touch points for yourself—and pay attention to their positive effects—you train your brain to develop a healing response that is always available to you. 

Try putting together a puzzle, painting, sketching, or drawing. These are powerful exercises that orient us in the present moment and help us pay attention to beautiful details in the world around us that otherwise go unnoticed. 

Call up a friend you haven’t seen in years and ask her or him to lunch. 

Adopt a pet—every day will be new and filled with love. 

Start a new hobby. Choose a skill area you wouldn’t have expected yourself to venture 

into, or one you always wanted to explore. 

  • Learn a new language. 
  • Take a vacation. 
  • Start your own garden.

Journal about it all. It will help you become aware of the goodness life brings your way when you’re not even looking for it, and helps clear out negative experiences from your consciousness. 

You can also literally nourish yourself with healing foods, including wild blueberries, melons, beets, bananas, persimmons, papayas, sweet potatoes, figs, oranges, mangoes, tangerines, apples, raw honey, and dates. These foods can create a glucose “storage bin” that helps prevent life disruptions from turning into PTSD. 

You don’t have to live in a tortured state of mind anymore. By providing your body and soul with proper nutritional, emotional, and soul-healing support, you can reclaim your vitality and go back to fully living your life.

To learn more about PTSD, check out Medical Medium: Secrets Behind Chronic and Mystery Illness and How to Finally Heal.

Disclaimer

Potato & Herb Salad

A lot of people these days are cautious about eating potatoes, fearing they are too high in carbohydrates, will slow down weight loss, or are too white in color to have any real nutritional benefits.

This is a misconception. Potatoes are an incredibly healthy food that offer us an abundance of benefits for healing. What we do need to be cautious of is what we choose to put on our potatoes. Typically potatoes are eaten with butter, heavy amounts of oil, topped with cheese, cream or bacon, or alongside a big piece of steak. This is where the problem and the confusion around potatoes stems from.

Potatoes are a nutritious, healthy food that are rich in vitamins A, C, & B-complex and minerals such as manganese, iron, magnesium, and potassium. Potatoes contain an antioxidant called quercetin which has anti-cancer and cardio-protective properties as well as a storage protein called patatin which has been shown to exhibit activity against disease causing free radicals.

Potatoes are an excellent source of B6, a vitamin which is essential for the formation of almost every new cell in the body. Vitamin B6 also is a vital component for the neurological system and for the creation of amines which are neurotransmitters that send messages from one nerve to the next. This makes potatoes an important food for those who are heavy thinkers and those recovering from stress damage and adrenal exhaustion. They are also particularly beneficial for depression, insomnia, sleep disorders, brain fog, and stress related illnesses.

Potatoes are also known to be good for promoting cardiovascular health and are highly beneficial for reducing the risk of heart attack, stroke, atherosclerosis, and COPD. Potatoes themselves are virtually fat-free and packed with dietary fiber which helps to prevent constipation and protect the colon from polyps and cancer. Their high fiber content also helps to lower blood LDL cholesterol and keep blood sugar levels stable and within normal range.

Today's recipe gives you a simple but flavorful way to enjoy the subtleties of the flavor in steamed potatoes, along with fresh herbs, garlic, zingy lemon and an optional kick from the jalapeño and/or mustard powder.

This recipe is quick and easy to pull together and offers a satiating lunch, dinner or side dish paired with a crunchy green salad. It's also a wonderful choice to bring to gatherings and parties, and tastes wonderful the next day for an easy grab and eat meal of leftovers. Enjoy!

Potato & Herb Salad

Ingredients:

  • 6 potatoes (red, blue, or yellow work great for this recipe)
  • 1 teaspoon olive oil
  • juice of 1 lemon (or more as desired)
  • 1 teaspoon lemon zest (or more as desired)
  • 2 teaspoons raw honey
  • 1/4 cup finely chopped red onion
  • 2 tbsp finely chopped chives
  • 1/4 cup finely chopped parsley
  • 1/4 cup finely chopped cilantro
  • 1/4 cup finely chopped dill
  • 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • sea salt and freshly cracked pepper to taste
  • finely chopped jalapeño (optional)
  • pinch mustard powder (optional)

Directions:

  1. Steam the potatoes until tender and they can be pierced with a fork without crumbling (approximately 30 minutes). Set aside to cool.
  2. Prepare the rest of the ingredients.
  3. Once the potatoes are cool, add the other ingredients into a big bowl with them, carefully tossing everything together. Taste and adjust lemon and seasoning as desired.
Enjoy this wonderfully easy, delicious and healthy dish!

Disclaimer

Green Smoothie Bowl

We all want to start our day with energy, positivity and vitality, yet so many people aren't having this experience. You might be one of them. 

Health conditions, stress, poor diet and lifestyle choices, environmental factors and more can burden us, and 7am can start to feel like the end of a long, hard day instead of the beginning of a fresh, new one!

Fortunately, there is much that we can do to help turn morning (or anytime) fatigue and blues around, and the recipe I have to share with you today is one tool that can help.

The combination of fresh fruit and greens in this recipe provides you with a vast array of healing antioxidants, flavonoids, vitamins and minerals that will nourish and cleanse your cells, tissues and organs, and infuse your body with more energy and vitality. The addition of barley grass juice extract powder adds further health benefits and healing properties.

Starting your day with this smoothie bowl, or enjoying it for lunch or as a snack, is an incredible way to boost the nutrition in your diet and more deeply cleanse and support the health of your body. Whether you are taking one small step at a time to improve your health, or doing the cleanse diet I outline in my book Medical Medium, this is a great addition to your routine. 

The base of this smoothie bowl is creamy, sweet and refreshing with a hint of tartness. If the addition of greens scares you, don't worry! You can hardly taste them in this recipe but you'll still receive their benefits. The different flavors and textures of the toppings give you something to bite into, making this smoothie bowl a really fun eating experience! 

I hope you love this recipe.

Banana-Kiwi Green Smoothie Bowl

Ingredients:

For the smoothie:

  • 1 frozen banana
  • 2 fresh bananas
  • 4 kiwi fruit, skin removed 
  • juice of 1/2 lime
  • 1 tsp barley grass juice powder
  • 1 cup spinach
  • 1/2 to 1 cup water

For toppings:

  • banana slices
  • kiwi fruit slices
  • organic shredded coconut
  • Or choose any other fruits you like.

Preparation:

  1. Blend the spinach with 1/2 cup of water. 
  2. Add the rest of the smoothie ingredients into the blender and blend until smooth. You may wish to add in extra water to facilitate blending or for a thinner consistency.
  3. Add toppings of choice and enjoy!

Disclaimer

 

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Cranberries - Cranberries are an excellent source of vitamin C, A, and beta carotene. They are packed with antioxidants and rate very high on the ORAC scale making it an ideal anti-aging and memory enhancing food. Cranberries have amazing anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties and are a vital food and supplement for anyone struggling w...
Ginger - Ginger is one of the world’s oldest and most popular medicinal spices. It is known to greatly aid in digestion and assimilation and is widely regarded to help prevent colds, flu, motion sickness, and vertigo. Ginger can also help to alleviate menstrual cramps, nausea, heart burn, migraines, sore throats, exhaustion, fatig...
Kale - Kale is a nutritionally packed leafy vegetable that contains incredible healing and rejuvenating properties. Kale is rich in omega-3 fatty acids, chlorophyll, amino acids, vitamins A, C, E, K, B-complex and minerals such as iron, magnesium, copper, and potassium. Kale is an anti-cancer powerhouse and contains phytochemicals suc...
Mango - Mangos are one of the most popular and nutritionally rich fruits in the world and are often referred to as “The King of the Fruits”. Mangos are an amazing source of vitamins A, C, E, and B-complex as well as health promoting flavonoids such as beta-carotene and alpha-carotene. Mangos are a powerful anti-cancer food ...
Pumpkin Seeds - Pumpkin Seeds are one of nature’s most nourishing foods. They contain high amounts of vitamin E, B-complex, magnesium, zinc, and omega-3 fatty acids. Pumpkin seeds are essential for men’s health and provide significant protection for the prostate gland. They are an excellent source of tryptophan which is critical fo...
Strawberries - Strawberries are a sweet, delicious fruit that are also a nutritional powerhouse and an all around amazing superfood. They are packed with Vitamins A , B-complex, & E and minerals such as manganese, iron, and zinc. They are rich in antioxidants which boosts their ability to rebuild, repair, and rejuvenate the body. 
Thyme - Thyme has a powerful ability to kill off bacteria and viruses and should be taken at first signs of a cold or illness. It is a rich source of several essential vitamins such as vitamins A, E, C, K, B-complex and folate and it is also one of the best sources of calcium, iron, manganese, selenium, and potassium. Thyme contains an...
Valerian - Valerian is a medicinal herb and root that has significant sedative and tranquilizing properties that can provide tremendous benefit to both the central nervous system and the muscular system. Valerian contains calcium, manganese, quercitin, and ascorbic acid as well as valepotriate and isovaleric acid which gives it its calmin...
Walnuts - Walnuts are one of the most antioxidant rich foods and are an excellent source of omega-3 fatty acids which have anti-inflammatory properties and are known to help prevent strokes, diabetes, coronary artery disease, and colon, prostate, and breast cancers. Walnuts are also high in B-complex vitamins and minerals such as copper,...

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